Public safety

Public safety issues in and around Lower Greenville

Homeless person sought in Greenville Avenue rape

See related story - Delayed rape incident notification raises questions about LGNA's nonchalant attitude, DPD procedures

It's not unusual for the so-called Lower Greenville NA Crimewatch to hold back crime information from those not part of their little clique.

But it gets really bad when the DPD Central Division's ICP (Interactive Community Policing) officer holds back really important information from all the crimewatch groups and residents.

By Avi S. Adelman under Public safety , Lower Greenville
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Dallas Police are better than most in dealing with photographers and cop watchers

By Sky Chadde / Unfair Park / Dallas Observer - October 17, 2014

Max Geron, the Dallas Police Department's media relations officer, smiled and shook his head in disbelief. In the video, a veteran East Coast police officer approached a photojournalist, who was standing across the street from a traffic stop with multiple squad cars present, and told him to leave. The officer didn't seem to know that, as long as they don't insert themselves into the scene, citizens and journalists have the right to film officers in public. Also, within reason, officers have the right to keep those taking pictures a certain distance away. However, "'Go away and step off the face of the earth' is not reasonable," said the moderator of a panel on the issue Thursday night, which is essentially what the East Coast officer told the photojournalist.

The moderator, a former photographer and a current media-rights lawyer, said that police officers have a sensitivity toward one of their own being filmed, and that's when Geron, who publicly is a progressive on policing, took the mic to defend not the East Coast officer's behavior, but the mentality that may lead to it.

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By Avi S. Adelman under Public safety , Legal issues
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DPD and DSO hosting "Right To Photograph and Record in Public" program for local law enforcement

Ever since 9/11, there has been a heightened awareness of anyone taking pictures or recording events in public. This issue has only been exacerbated by the widespread proliferation of cellphone cameras and the ability of everyone to post photos and recordings on the Internet where they may be viewed and shared, in many cases going “viral” with thousands of views.

Many in law enforcement have the erroneous belief they can order people to stop taking pictures or recording in public. Interference and in some cases arrests stemming from those actions have led to a number of court cases resulting in six-figure settlements, new policies and procedures and sometimes serious disciplinary actions against the officers involved.

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By Avi S. Adelman under Public safety , Legal issues
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DPD cop investigates bike accident, says BD needs permission to take his photo

There was a bike-vs-car accident on Thrusday evening at Bennett and Ross Avenues. Since BD had to go to the bank down the street, he grabbed a camera bag and drove to the scene. Shot about 20 photos of the scene in about 10 minutes.

BD will include those photos here. But that's not what this post is about.

It's about the DPD A&I (accident investigator) who arrived on the scene about ten minutes later. Immediately upon his arrival, the attitude of the already on-scene officers changes. One officer tells BD he needs to move way back, like way up on the CVS pharmacy parking lot, 'cuz really, he already took alot of photos. BD eventually got to stand his ground on the sidewalk, but only after the intervention of another officer who did not have an attitude. That officer stated the A&I told him to make BD back up (and we have that on tape).

By Avi S. Adelman under Public safety , Lower Greenville
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Avi Adelman is on a crusade to squash DART's No-Pictures policy, and it's (sort of) working

By Eric Nicholson / Dallas Observer / Unfair Park

Moving away from Lower Greenville last summer, longtime neighborhood activist Avi Adelman could have turned over a new leaf. The camera he used to shove in the faces of drunk teenagers and public urinators could have been stowed in his closet. He could have quietly pulled the plug on Barkingdogs.org and traded the life of a semi-professional activist/troll for one of monk-like solitude on the leafy streets of Junius Heights.

He didn't. Adelman isn't really cut out for serene contemplation. And though his new digs are far from the strip of bars and restaurants dedicated himself to patrolling, the move has given him the freedom to lock on to other targets. Like Dallas Area Rapid Transit.

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By Avi S. Adelman under Public safety , Legal issues
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